Category Archives: astrotourism

Stargazing at Sal Salis

We may be biased, but we think our location is pretty unbeatable. We’re nestled in the dunes of the Cape Range National Park, on the shores of the Ningaloo Reef Marine Park and in a designated Dark Sky area. What does that trifecta mean for you? Well, you can access unspoilt, rugged ranges and gorges, swim in crystal clear water teeming with marine life, and see a sky full of stars.

Whilst many of our guests are aware of the national parks, the Dark Sky Area is something a little more unexpected. According to some scientists, we will struggle to see the stars in some parts of the world by 2025. The effects of light pollution are getting so bad that UNESCO now wants to include the sky at night as part of our human heritage because it is such a wonderful sight to behold.

If you have been fortunate enough to see the stars on a bright summer’s night, you will find it hard to believe that this amazing spectacle will no longer be there for future generations to see. And yet that’s exactly what will happen if too much artificial light prevents us from seeing the stars at night.

Sal Salis is located in a designated Dark Sky area, where uninterrupted views of the milky way will astound you. Seriously, the stars here are something that our guests say will stay with them forever.

Stargazing ignites a child-like curiosity and wonder in adults. It encourages us to think bigger and look at the world around us. It’s something that can be almost meditative and can be enjoyed alone, or as part of a group.

Our biggest hope for our guests is that they can reconnect with nature and switch off from the modern world when they stay with us. From the lack of wifi, to our compostable toilets and dinners by candle-light, this is a place to disconnect and reconnect. The starry night sky is the cherry on top when it comes to reflecting and relaxing.

If you’re planning ahead, in April 2023, Sal Salis is in the path of a total solar eclipse.  A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the earth and the sun, totally or partly obscuring the sun from our vision.  A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon’s apparent diameter is larger than the sun’s and all direct sunlight is blocked, turning day into darkness. This is sure to be an amazing sight for any keen astronomers.